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You found the perfect pose reference for your art, but it's not a stock image. Maybe it's another drawing or someone's photography. What do you do? 

32%
1,101 deviants said I use it but I modify it in some way so it's not an exact copy.
24%
813 deviants said I use it anyway. I'm only using the pose and they can't own that.
21%
717 deviants said I recreate the pose on my own and use that as a reference instead of the original.
9%
324 deviants said I try to find a reference that is similar but licensed for use.
9%
295 deviants said Something else.
5%
171 deviants said I don't use it as a reference; it's someone else's work and that would be wrong.

Devious Comments

:iconcoolmoslice:
coolmoslice Featured By Owner 11 hours ago  Professional Digital Artist
we are in a world that needs artistic awakening.. I'd be happy to know I inspired anyone to create anything in any way, as long as there is creation involved... obviously it's not cool to just take someones work and claim it... Karma will eat your soul for that.
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:iconsabretooth451:
Sabretooth451 Featured By Owner 1 day ago
I'll use the pose, but I ALWAYS try to reference the artist/model and make them aware of its usage.
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:icong-girl1:
g-girl1 Featured By Owner 1 day ago  Student
If there's one I see that I think is PERFECT for an idea, i'll try to find a doll or one of those little drawing people thingies and then make it do the same pose which I don't think could be classed as tracing
drawing people thingies..
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:iconsahasa:
Sahasa Featured By Owner 2 days ago
Referencing is NOT the same as copying. From a legal point of view there's a huge difference between these two.
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:iconsenshistock:
SenshiStock Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Hobbyist Photographer
Indeed!
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:icontrinly:
trinly Featured By Owner 4 days ago
Reference is not the same as copying.  You shouldn't be able to look at a piece of art and recognize the reference material used.  Your art is your creation which means whatever vision you have in your mind will need multiple different sources of reference.

If by chance you happen upon a reference piece that is the exact pose you're trying to duplicate, challenge yourself and draw that pose at a different angle using the same reference material.  Use multiple references of that same pose.
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:iconghostglider:
GhostGlider Featured By Owner 5 days ago  Student Digital Artist
That depends on how faithfully you use it. If it's the same pose but a different perspective, or you just use the way the spine curves or how the arms are placed then I'd say you're in the clear. Reference isn't supposed to make your own work look like a copy anyway. If it is then you're probably tracing or not inputting enough of your own and that's another problem altogether. The whole "recreating the pose yourself" is pretty clever too.
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:iconnanaminara:
NanamiNara Featured By Owner 6 days ago
Sometimes I search for poses in other way, not only from stocks. Not always references to original. As you said: they cannot own that, but they are still authors, so... I make my own shoots. Or do a shoots for someone from my family or friends and ask them for using them for my arts. It's the best way for making your own graphic: you have you'r pose from dreams and can do everything if it's your photo or ask about help. Simple, clean and without any restrictions.
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:icontessabe:
tessabe Featured By Owner 6 days ago
If it's that perfect I ask, otherwise I look elsewhere.
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:iconachildoftheking:
AChildOfTheKing Featured By Owner May 17, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
i try to get with them personally and ask for permission you would be surprised how many people say yes they just want to be asked. also if i plan to sell it i offer a portion of the sale and they always seem to be up for that
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:iconstorymaker91:
StoryMaker91 Featured By Owner May 16, 2015  Hobbyist
I would probably ask first but I do agree that you can't own poses.
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:iconspaceroses:
Spaceroses Featured By Owner May 14, 2015  Student Traditional Artist
It was a toss-up between "use it anyways since they can't own a pose" and "use it but modify it in some way". Since I draw mainly a lot of my poses (when I do use reference) are actually culled from magazines or other sources like that and I mainly use it for information like "Okay...the arm bends THAT way" or "The head tilted like that sits THERE on the neck". Then by the time I'm done adding character features and hair and clothes and details it usually only has the faintest resemblance (if any) to the original photo. I generally don't go looking for pose references in the main photography galleries of DA...I stick to the stock photo galleries for that and follow the rules of the stock-artist in question. 
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:icondisneyprincessludwig:
disneyprincessludwig Featured By Owner May 14, 2015  Student General Artist
I think it really depends what you are doing. Like if you were to draw a skeleton of the pose and then flesh out the drawing on your own or take inspiration (like do the pose yourself and take a photo for reference) that's fine because you haven't copied/stolen anything since a pose is a position. But I think if you just copy the person exactly from the photo as they are it is an infringement of copyright unless you've received permission. But there's so many good free reference websites and books and stock poses for artists I personally don't have this problem. 
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:iconblightedangel:
blightedangel Featured By Owner May 14, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I have contacted photographers before, to ask if I can use their work.  Some have said yes (usually those with fewer professional credentials,) some have said no, and a few have refused to even respond at all (which I find a bit rude.) 

As an artist, I know how incredibly disrespectful it is to steal from someone else. I'm sure many of us have had a piece of artwork or some other brain child stolen from them, and it's not a nice feeling at all.  I would never want to make anyone else feel that way.  And the world of art has enough trouble with potential employers disrespecting the creators, so I feel strongly that peer respect is a necessity amongst ourselves.

Respect your peers, fellow artists!
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:iconchammy3760:
chammy3760 Featured By Owner May 13, 2015  Student General Artist
ask the original author for permission to reference, as well as try not to make it an exact copy.
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:iconabsolute-sero:
Absolute-Sero Featured By Owner May 13, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Totally depends on how close the pose is to what I want - typically I end up finding 2-3 or more poses and collectively using them all to get to the pose I need. Or what I rather do is 'study' them, as usually when I'm looking for pose reference, it's to see how best to illustrate perspective or muscle, not copy the actual photo/drawing.
I tend to deviate a lot from the originals anyway.. it seems like I'm incapable of just drawing a pose reference, got to alter it to make it my own/challenge myself :XD:  I don't think I've ever used drawings as reference, so I'm exempt from that category and have no opinion there.

The 'mention' system makes it easy to shoot two birds with one stone - if I really reference a photo, I will link the artist and possibly the picture in my description (I do the same thing with stock, you might have noticed XD). Mostly I link the artist and encourage people to go give the gallery a look-over rather than the particular picture :)  Especially glad to do that if the photo was a life-saving pose reference.
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:iconsenshistock:
SenshiStock Featured By Owner May 13, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
If you worked hard on a piece that let's say references a vase from a photograph, and when you credited that photograph the person got upset and asked you to take it down, what would you do?
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:iconabsolute-sero:
Absolute-Sero Featured By Owner 6 days ago  Hobbyist General Artist
Wellll I'd take the situation differently depending - a photo of a vase, especially one that they made themself.. if I didn't ask first, it'd be my own fault, so I'd probably alter the picture (in this case, the vase) significantly if I didn't want to take it down.  Asking permission isn't a bad idea, so I might kick myself for being lazy and not asking first. XP

Poses are a really grey area though I think..  I do agree with the 'you can't own poses' option, though if done too closely, it is somewhat copying the work. I'd have to handle each case differently myself XD;  But that's why rather than use a single reference, I tend to go through multiple, and just attempt to draw using what I learn by studying the images and draw it from my own head.
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:iconsenshistock:
SenshiStock Featured By Owner 6 days ago  Hobbyist Photographer
That really is best :D

I'm lazy so I always just use my own refs :P
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:iconxmjjmoonwalker:
xMJJMoonwalker Featured By Owner May 12, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
If I find it on dA/tumblr/a website that allows comments/messages, I will ask the artist first. If I just find it on Google and it doesn't link back to such a site, I just use it but only for the pose and I change details or parts of it so it isn't an exact copy.
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:iconfourpartfox:
FourPartFox Featured By Owner May 12, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
I ask if I can, and if I can't or if they say no, I try to recreate the pose myself, either with myself or with digital or physical mannequins.
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:iconslykm:
SLYKM Featured By Owner May 12, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I'm a combination of the first two responses. You can't own a pose, because there are only so many ways the body can bend and there are only so many different angles. Besides then photographers would start arguing about what pose their models can do, which I don't think they do, so my response is fair.

But I usually just need partial reference anyway, like if I just need to see how the arm bends, but don't need the hand pose. Or if I just need to see what the body looks at a certain angle, but don't need the whole pose. Also, there is still work, like like the coloring, design, outfits, sometimes I use completely different gender and body type. I think that makes it original enough because I still needed to put effort and creativity into it.

Drawing from a reference is not like tracing, it is still difficult to draw from reference. References just help you see how the body/environment works. So I think credit is optional if the pose is similar enough, but I won't ask permission to use a pose, many professional artists would be in the wrong if that became mandatory.
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:iconfold39crane:
Fold39Crane Featured By Owner May 12, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
On the rare occasion that I use references... (ahaha)

My general guideline with poses specifically is:
1) Use as many different images for the same pose (just pull up the wall of images on google)
2) Sketch them out (1 to 5 minutes gesture sketches)
3) Draw based on what I learned and whatever feels natural. 

For me, references are just things you look at to learn more about something. Like writing a college essay. You don't use them to plagiarize, you use those reference to help you write your own sentences and structure. It's not the same as in-citations though (to set that straight, since there is a whole bag of issues with this analogy I won't get into). 

You shouldn't rely solely on one person's drawing or photography (non-stock) because at that point, you are re-creating an image rather than referencing a pose. Which means you must receive permission. At least, that is how I feel about it. 
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:iconsenshistock:
SenshiStock Featured By Owner May 12, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
Very thoughtful!
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:iconcavelupa:
CaveLupa Featured By Owner May 12, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
If the artist doesn't claim all over the place that their photos may never ever under any circumstances may be used as a reference, I ask them if it was okay if I used this photo as a reference. If they say no, I'll respect that
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:icondemon-kagetsuki:
Demon-Kagetsuki Featured By Owner May 11, 2015  Hobbyist
I just ask for permission first before I use it
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:iconjorgeluis:
jorgeluis Featured By Owner May 11, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
As long as it's used as reference only (no tracing), I think it's fine both in a legal and moral way.
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:iconkilik96:
Kilik96 Featured By Owner May 11, 2015
I usually don't use others art for reference, and if I do, I try to learn from it. For example, I see a really good drawing, the textures are just awesome, and I want to learn how to depict textures, I try to figure out how the artist did it, and I'll convert it into my style without even knowing it. I only copy poses when I want to learn how to draw them. I use reference or other people's art only for help. So if I find a reference and it's someone's art, I'll use the pose, but I don't like copying others art, because in the best piece of art contains mistakes, and I'll learn the mistakes as well.(I really can't copy. My style is in my "art" and I can't do anything against it. Even if I try to copy, I can't.) If it's a photography, (I'm sorry if I'm rude) I will use it as a reference. Photography is art, but somehow I can use it as a reference. (sorry if my Englis is bad)
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:iconsenshistock:
SenshiStock Featured By Owner May 11, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
You're message is clear, no worries about your English! Thanks for the feedback! I agree that copying other's art can lead to copying their mistakes. Drawing from life is always the best, but sometimes a photo has to do
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:iconkilik96:
Kilik96 Featured By Owner May 11, 2015
And I can't stop the time to draw a jumping girl down, or say to my friend's cat: Hold still for a few hours. And do not take this hat off. If you do this, I'll bring you fish. I cant say to the Sun: Hey you there! Yes you, Sun! Please hold still for one or two ours, I need to draw this flower down, do not play with the shadows. And untill I'm not enough fast to draw down a moving thing, I must use photos, and I can't take photos with a dead chamera, or I can't take photos from New York, when I'm in Hungary. And I cant take good photos from fast things with a cheap chamera, and I don't want to squawk about this but right now I can't buy a really good one. So right now, I'm forced to use other people's photos untill I get a really good chamera and enough money to travel around the world. (My comment probably sounds a little rude, I didn't mean to be rude)
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:iconsenshistock:
SenshiStock Featured By Owner May 11, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
:giggle: It's okay! It's a serious challenge as an artist to find the right resources. Keep on drawing!! :D
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:iconkilik96:
Kilik96 Featured By Owner May 11, 2015
I'll die from drawind :D
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:iconkasonsama:
KasonSama Featured By Owner May 10, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
If it's just for the pose I don't think it matters, though I always give credit, I'm a really shy introverted person so asking permission is often really hard, I normally just give the credit. If the original artist asks me to take it down I always will.

I'll be a little bummed sure, but I can understand.
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:icontheemptychest:
TheEmptyChest Featured By Owner May 10, 2015
If it's just a pose you're using as a reference, I don't think it's a big deal. It's not like you can copyright a pose, y'know? But if you're copying an image in its entirety, I would consider it "stealing." Basically I agree with nintendobratkat.
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:icon8bribee8:
8BriBee8 Featured By Owner May 10, 2015  Student General Artist
It would depend for me, its not really okay to use a drawing (and not a good idea for learning in general) or someone else's art. I would feature the photography reference, maybe try to recreate it with people or a mannequin. As long as it's not a piece of art, which can include photography, then It doesn't really matter. 

If I thought that I was crossing a line, then I simply wouldn't post it online.
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:icondeuggi-chan:
Deuggi-Chan Featured By Owner May 10, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
I feel like it can be a slippery slope of what is and isn't okay. If you're using it as a pose reference, I don't feel it's stealing, but form an artist's perspective, it would at least be nice if there was credit given.

I'm sure most times if you just ask, they'll let you use it as a pose so long as you credit them, etc, etc.
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:iconmewmew34:
Mewmew34 Featured By Owner May 10, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
If I find an image with a pose I'm looking for, I'm probably going to use it as reference regardless of where said image is from or what type of image it is.  I don't copy images down to the exact detail, and I'm always drawing everything entirely on my own, so it's hard to make valid claims that I'm "stealing" anything, and it's hard for anybody to claim they own any given pose considering the human body can only move in so many ways.  If an image's description asks that it be linked to when used as a reference, I try and remember to link to it (but may not always remember since it can be months from the time I draw something to the time I actually finish it and get it online), otherwise I probably won't worry about it.
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:iconlady-leliel:
lady-leliel Featured By Owner May 10, 2015  Student General Artist
send them a note and ask if i can draw them, most people are more than happy to be painted for free! (plus link back ofc ofc)
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:iconcicisartandstuff:
CicisArtandStuff Featured By Owner May 9, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
I'd say that it's more that I find inspiration for pose ideas through other artists' work. Like "oh cool, never woulda thought about doing a perspective from that angle" or "wow, what a cool looking backwards jump twisty thing she's doing! I've never seen that!" And then I might take some aspects of a pose or angle and make it into my own.

I find that most of the times I'll look back at a photo/photos I was looking at for ideas and it doesn't even look close to the same. In fact when you keep true to yourself and how your hand moves naturally, it's kinda harder to have it looking more similar to a reference than not. I know a few have said it already but it's true, if it exists already, why try to recreate it? Make something awesome and new! But there's nothing wrong with having a little help to get ya there.
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:iconjimibab:
jimibab Featured By Owner May 9, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I almost never make an exact copy of something. Why redo what's been done? So, I'll use it as a base and make modifications, but, I still try to get permission
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:iconchazzvc:
ChazzVC Featured By Owner May 9, 2015  Student Digital Artist
steal it anyways and hope you don't get caught :) Art feeds on itself, inspiring other artist and branching out existing ideas even more (just look at anime, it all started as a small group of comics which then lead to millions of other drawings copying its style
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:icondisneyfanjulia:
DisneyFanJulia Featured By Owner May 9, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
generally the best option is to not post the drawing you did if your not given permission to. just keep it for practice purposes 
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:iconsephirothsflamedwing:
SephirothsFlamedWing Featured By Owner May 9, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
My first response is to try to find stock similar to it. If I can't, though, I'd modify my pose from it slightly. Usually, when I'm using reference pictures, I'm only using it for a specific thing (muscle tension, hands, feet, etc.) or a general pose anyway. Plus, I tend to use a mirror anyway to make sure it looks right.
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:iconnekonahisaki:
NekonaHisaki Featured By Owner May 9, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
I would ask for permission if such use wasn't blatantly prohibited in their info.
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:icondragonwarriorstm:
Dragonwarriorstm Featured By Owner May 9, 2015  Professional Artist
so many photographers are so useful its not funny and all it take is a simple question, 
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:iconandimccloud:
andimccloud Featured By Owner May 9, 2015
I ask the artist if they'd mind me using the pose as reference material.  If they say yes, great!  If they say no, I sulk for a while but eventually get over myself and move on. 8D
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:icontuesdaynightcompany:
TuesdayNightCompany Featured By Owner May 9, 2015
I blend the pose with other poses when I have non-stock as a reference.
There's no such thing as a perfect pose in stock, in my opinion.  I blend angles and different references, so it's not often something is even identifiable as a coming from any particular picture.
It's rare that I use non-stock for anything other than just viewing it.
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:iconringo-ichigo:
Ringo-Ichigo Featured By Owner May 9, 2015  Student Digital Artist
Depends on the piece, but if it's the pose, I usually reference it because I usually have my own idea on it and the pose itself can't be made exclusively yours. The picture and your take on it is what makes it art. I mean, if you want to claim the pose is all yours and you invented it, then you'd have to slap a lawsuit if someone even made that pose ever. (Like, imagine if someone tried to claim this for waving your hand over your head.) You'd be trying to police someone else's body movements which is kinda ridiculous.

Plus, half the time, I end up changing it because it's not working at all, one part isn't working, or something along these lines. There've been times where I have three or more similar poses up to reference because A has the right spine/weight, but B's arms are shown better and C's got the perfect hand position. 
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:iconsenshistock:
SenshiStock Featured By Owner May 12, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
yeah sometimes you just have to grab from multiple places to figure it out!
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:iconringo-ichigo:
Ringo-Ichigo Featured By Owner May 13, 2015  Student Digital Artist
I was actually doing that today when my brother was looked and was like "What are you doing? What are all those?"
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